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Krack Wi-Fi vulnerability
We at Big Bang have been following the news regarding the WPA2 hack known as Krack (key reinstallation attack).

During the week of October 16, 2017, researchers announced the discovery of a vulnerability which exploits the WPA2 protocol and allows attackers to steal sensitive information from unencrypted communications. It may also allow attackers to inject code (presumably malware) into websites.

"It’s important to keep the impact of KRACK in perspective: KRACK does not affect HTTPS traffic, and KRACK’s discovery does not mean all Wi-Fi networks are under attack."

The list of Wi-Fi vendors/chipset manufacturers is extensive and Big Bang is in the process of searching/monitoring each vendor for updates to their wi-fi network drivers that specifically address the Krack vulnerability. This process is entirely subject to the availability of adequately-prepared drivers by the chipset manufacturers. We anticipate that this update will take place over a lengthy period of time and in fact, may not be realized for those vendors that are out of business, no longer supporting versions of chipsets or are not prepared to update their device drivers.

If you become aware of a wi-fi network driver that specifically addresses the Krack vulnerability and you suspect that we have not yet encountered that driver, please bring it to the immediate attention of Big Bang Support.

Thank you for your patience and assistance.

For additional information, please refer to the following links:
KRACK Vulnerability: What You Need To Know
Key Reinstallation Attacks: Breaking WPA2 by forcing nonce reuse
Here’s what you can do to protect yourself from the KRACK WiFi vulnerability

Fix a failed Application Install/Uninstall

So, you’re sitting at your PC (or a customer/user’s pc) minding your own beeswax, just installing an application, or perhaps uninstalling an application when… BAM! Something awful hits the fan! Now the bloody thing is all locked up and not responding to any key strokes or mouse clicks. It won’t even let you open up Task Manager to see what in the hell it might be up to, even though you’re pretty sure that it’s up to absolutely nothing…


Now, invariably, the user was standing, looking over your shoulder, absolutely clueless about the fact that you’re boned and about the fact that you too are absolutely clueless… (No, I’ve never been in that position!)


If you’ve been working with PCs for any appreciable amount of time, any good troubleshooter knows that sometimes, for one reason or another, an install or uninstall will get “borked” and that usually happens at just the wrong moment, of course. Thank you Murphy, for that little gem of a “law”…


What happens during application installation or uninstallation?

Lots of stuff, really: files get copied, registry settings are potentially altered or created, active directory information may be read or altered, schema extensions may be initiated, operating system variables may be set, and Programs and Features registration is typically instantiated. Of course, it varies widely based on application demands and requirements… When, for various reasons, one of the necessary steps for an app install or uninstall doesn’t complete or fails outright, it can leave the app in a state of limbo, inhibiting the required re-installation of the app or, in extreme circumstances, it can inhibit the usefulness of the entire system. At the very least, it leaves administrators with a loss of confidence in the system and a dread that the problem is indicative of future time-consuming troubleshooting.


What can you do when it all goes bad?

I’ve personally used many methods in the past including registry/file scraping where I try to find all references to the app and ruthlessly (albeit recklessly) remove all discovered instances, in a subtle homage to Orson Wells. I’ve also tried clearing temp files and have, of course, resorted to the time-tested “restart and see if that helps” method, usually followed immediately by, “Ok, let’s see if a hard boot helps”. What else? I’ve restored from Restore Points, run OS diagnostics; I’ve even run some very questionable, 3rd party applications to “reset” the registry. Basically, I’ve tried everything short of waving chicken bones, drenched in the blood of the vanquished, under a full moon at midnight on a solstice. I’m saving that one for a really critical situation!


Although some of these solutions have worked some of the time, most of them live in the “60% of the time, it works every time” category. Although there are not hard-and-fast, always effective methods, I’ve been made aware of some interesting tools from Microsoft and, so far, have had success with them. I thought others may appreciate knowing about them.


Microsoft FixIt – Fix problems with programs that cannot be installed or uninstalled

This tool is so simple to execute that I’m having difficulty elaborating, so perhaps for once, I won’t. Suffice it to say that the UI is intuitive.


Download MS Fix It - Fix Problems - Install/Uninstall

Choose desired level of automation:


MS Fix It Troubleshooter

Indicate when the problem occurs:


MS Fix It uninstall install

Select the affected product (this example = uninstall):


MS Fix It select affected program

When the process is complete, you’ll receive a results screen indicating that it was (or was not) able to resolve the problem. It’s that simple.

 

Microsoft MsiZap

This tool is a bit more involved and, I presume, a bit more risky — think of “malware detection programs reminding you that removing some discovered items may result in the untimely death of your OS” risky. The tool removes all Windows Installer information for one or more applications on a PC through the clever use of Product Codes. With command line options, you can also elect to remove rollback information, remove the “In-Progress” key, or even change ACL’s to Admin Full Control.

Download MsiZap

As the command line nature of the application can be a bit unwieldy, I’ve included a link to examples of its use as well. Heads-up! You’ll need to be able to determine Product Codes for applications that you’d like to target. Fun!


Syntax Examples:

MsiZap Examples


That's all for now


In summary, we all have our methods; some of those methods are more sound than others or at least more based in actual computer science and we’ll likely continue to employ what we perceive to have worked for us in the past. That’s great. Here are two more for your arsenal. Godspeed, John Glenn!




New Website for Big Bang and the UIU

Oh, you’ve noticed? We’re blushing.

For those of you that didn’t catch it, our website got a little facelift complete overhaul this past week. In addition to a fresh look and the marriage of the once-separate Big Bang and UIU sites, our new slice of cyber real estate includes improved functionality and brand-new features (with more to come!)

Responsive design for tablets and mobile

In addition to our new desktop site, we’ve added both tablet and mobile versions, so you can browse easily from the device of your choice.

Revised navigation for easy UIU version selection

Whether you are using the UIU Classic (better known as the UIU 4.x to you lifers out there), the new UIU 5, or one of the UIU plug-ins for SCCM or MDT, you’ll find it all here.

Expedited UIU Support case handling

Speed up your support experience with the improved UIU Support request form. Submit the form for your next technical support issue, and a ticket will be automatically generated and sent to our technical support team. You’ll receive an email notification that your case has been received and also get a reference number to include in future emails for speedy handling. Also, please remember to attach any applicable UIU log and setupapi files for faster resolution of your issue.

Online User Guides for every UIU version

Browse the UIU Install and User Guides through each UIU version’s Table of Contents, or go old-school-but-effective with your browser’s built-in search capability.

RSS feed option for UIU Release Notes and UIU Blog

Whether you are an existing customer or testing with the free UIU Trial, you can sign up to receive notifications of industry-related blog posts and news about UIU Updates (you can also, of course, follow us on Facebook and Twitter).

Let us know what you think!

We’re adding new content and features every week, so check back for all-new UIU videos, case studies and additional resources. Let us know what you think below or email us here.